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#1 Denfrosnesko

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Posted 16 January 2011 - 06:49 PM

Hi,

I'm racing a carbed 1999 cbr 600 fx. It's going on the diet before season start. One of the things I'm thinking of doing is removing the alternator and converting to a total loss system.

Is there anything I should be aware off regarding this?

I do realize that the bike will have limited running time before I need to charge the battery again.

Thanks for any input.
Martin

#2 Big Nick

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Posted 16 January 2011 - 09:02 PM

Hi there Martin,

A good question!

I have been using a 1999 Yamaha R6 with a total loss system for the past 18 months. I grew to love it but I have cursed it soooo many times in the early days.

Ok, you will need your battery to be a "good" one... not a cheapie or an old one and you will probably have to replace it every 12-18 months to keep it at its best. To gove you an idea, mine cost 80.

There are up sides and down sides for these systems, here are my views having run one for so long.

Positive: the bike spins up a bit faster, less weight, slightly more power.

The downsides or tips I can give you are:

I used to keep the bike on optimate inbetween sessions on a trackday, plug in tyre warmers and optimate. I generally used to bump start my bike as starting it off the button was where the major drain on the battery came from. It was always annoying when being kept in the paddock for ages with the system running (esp as I had no radiator fans too) so I would generally wait to be last out to unsure I could shoot straight out, if not, get good at bump starting without any help, its easy really. Endurance races with just one bike like the NBC become impossible.

If I'm honest it did make me HAVE to think about my bike a lot more than my mates, I was often jealous watching them just flicking the switch and never caring about their battery but once you get the hang of the intricacies, I started loving the system and I'm sure my R6 was a little rocket ship!!

I'd say do it, but always make sure you are doubly prepared and make your first purchase a good battery!

Cheers,
2011 Bemsee Rookie 600 Cup
Yamaha R6
I'll be the one wearing the big smile!

#3 Mike Edwards

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Posted 16 January 2011 - 10:18 PM

Don't forget you can always hook up another battery to start the thing in the garage before heading out on circuit. Demon Tweeks do the necessary electrical connectors.

See www.minitwins.co.uk for the latest on the MiniTwins race series.


#4 Denfrosnesko

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 11:12 PM

Thanks for the input. It's a go!

Bike was supposed to run at NBC, but since they changed their regulations I don't find it that interesting anymore.

Only thing left on the bike that needs electricity is the clocks. Some people claim I can get 6 hours racing out of a good battery... Testing in March will show! :)

#5 Big Nick

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 12:55 AM

probably true, but best to put the bike on charge when its on its warmers and a bump start for good measure, i still used the button if i "had" to and never had any issues
2011 Bemsee Rookie 600 Cup
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I'll be the one wearing the big smile!

#6 Lecky Guy

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 07:29 AM

Some good points above, the 99fx uses a fuel pump so draws about 3.5 amps when running, a good 10amp/hr battery (standard rating for most bikes thesedays) will run it quite happily for 2 - 3 hrs (simple maths 10/3.5 = 2.8 hrs, if not running a fuel pump this goes up to about 4 hrs.

However starting it on the electric starter will kill this as the battery delivers around 200amps turning the thing over which if even for a couple of seconds is going to eat into the batteries reserves.

Use a good battery & keep another fully charged ready to go (just in case!)
Keep it on the Optimate all the time its not used
Bump Start it whenever possible but dont be afraid of using the lecky start if absolutey required

Finally (all honda owners be aware)
Honda use a brass terminal to connect the wiring loom to the alloy frame, you get dissimilar metal corrosion between the two (causing all sorts of interesting electrical problems) so every few months take it off & give it and the mounting area on the frame a good clean

John
Track Electronics
01603 263939
John
Track Electronics
www.trackelectronics.co.uk
01603 263939

#7 Bikeflipper

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 10:18 AM

Think you have to ask yourself first, can i lose weight, am i as fit as i can be, as running a total loss system is going to bring an advantage, just a whole lot of trouble.

I left my ignition on at Pembury over night once, ruined my friday.

#8 Denfrosnesko

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 07:27 PM

LOL, I guess there's always a kilo or two that can be lost, but they are good for crash impact! :D

This might be a noob question, but if I ran two batteries wouldn't I still get the performance advantage of the bike spinning up faster? And then if the two batteries could be lightweight I would still have saved some weight.

Not sure if you can get 10amp/hr batteries in lithium, but thees weigh just under a kg.
https://www.harris-p..._Batteries.html

#9 kiwi_uk

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Posted 21 January 2011 - 06:58 PM

LOL, I guess there's always a kilo or two that can be lost, but they are good for crash impact! :D

This might be a noob question, but if I ran two batteries wouldn't I still get the performance advantage of the bike spinning up faster? And then if the two batteries could be lightweight I would still have saved some weight.

Not sure if you can get 10amp/hr batteries in lithium, but thees weigh just under a kg.
https://www.harris-p..._Batteries.html


I wouldn't run a Lithium battery on a total loss system. They do not like being discharged so you run the risk of destroying your expensive batteries.




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